Designated Collections MUPI Match event (June 14)

MUPI Match Designated Collections, Arts Council England Offices, Birmingham, 14 June (10am-4.30pm)

Are you:

  • A postgraduate, postdoctoral or established researcher, keen to explore the rich possibilities for working with collections that are a vital part of England’s artistic and cultural heritage;
  • An academic whose students would like to research designated collections?

If so, this MUPI National Sandpit could be just what you are looking for! The event is interactive and free to take part in. Bring your ideas, your energy, and your expertise and prepare to be challenged and inspired.

Register for this event

A key element of the Arts Council England Designated Collection scheme is that the collections meet the Research Value criteria – so that the collection is, or has the potential to be, an essential research collection; and the collections makes a major contribution to the public understanding of the subject. One of the major challenges faced by museums developing academic partnerships is networking with academics, and having sufficient resources to plan effective and mutually beneficial projects.

 The ACE funded MUPI project aims to address this by bringing together museums and academics in a series of focused and facilitated networking events; which will help academics explore the research potential of designated collections, meet potential museum partners, and have the opportunity to apply for seed funding grants to help develop project ideas. The MUPI Match event on Wednesday 14 June is dedicated to museums with Designated Collections.

To find out more about the Designated Collections scheme, click here.

There are many benefits to museums and universities working together, from improving audience understanding to developing more effective collections knowledge or interpretation; from inspiring museum audiences with cutting edge research to developing new exhibits and exhibitions; the opportunities are endless; and networking within and between the sectors can help museums and academics realise the research potential of these nationally important collections.

However, finding a partner and having the resources to explore how you might work together can be challenging. This MUPI National Sandpit draws upon a tried and tested methodology, which brings people together to develop new partnerships. Each session involves museum staff, volunteers, and academics working together to find mutually beneficial ideas that they would like to develop together. This event focuses on unlocking the research potential of designated collections.

 A small grants fund of £6000 available; the MUPI Match event includes an opportunity for teams formed at the event to bid for funding (of between £500-£1500) from the MUPI Match fund. This ‘thinking funding’  will enable people to do desk research; have conversations; travel and attend site visits/meetings; test ideas; and work together to plan their potential project. This thinking funding provides a critical part of the process, helping people to work out if and how to work together and refine their ideas. Teams will be supported to develop their partnership, and find effective ways to fund their project in the future.

Please note that booking is essential. You can apply for a place using the registration link above.

MUPI Match events are delivered through the Museum University Partnership Initiative, funded by Arts Council England’s Museum Resilience Fund and developed in partnership with the Share Academy project and Paddy McNulty Associates.

Pathways to Culture Change Report

The University of Birmingham is pleased to have contributed to a new report from the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). The Pathways to Culture Change report focuses on learning from the 10 Catalyst Seed Fund projects (CSFs), including UoB. The report seeks to ensure that other HEIs can benefit from the insights of all institutions involved by sharing the journeys they have travelled, the learning they have done, and the tools they have generated.

The ten CSF projects were established in 2015 and have evidenced significant impact within their host universities. The Pathways to Culture Change report tells an encouraging story of what can be achieved relatively quickly with a limited budget. The CSF Pathways report provides useful insights for others wanting to develop their own project.

Read it here: Pathways to Culture Change Report

Research for All: Call for papers

Research For All: Universities and Society is a new journal for anyone, working inside or outside universities, who is committed to seeing research make a difference in society.

Engagement with research goes further than participation in it. Engaged individuals and communities initiate, advise, challenge or collaborate with researchers. Their involvement is always active and they have a crucial influence on the conduct of the research – on its design or methods, products, dissemination or use. Research For All focuses on research that involves universities and communities, services or industries working together.

Contributors and readers are from both inside and outside of higher education. They include researchers, policymakers, managers, practitioners, community-based organizations, schools, businesses and the intermediaries who bring these people together. The journal aims to raise the quality of engaged research by stimulating discussion about the effectiveness of engagement with researchers, research outcomes and processes.

We are currently looking for articles that describe, explain and analyse engaged research. Articles may include words, images, audio and video.

Public Engagement Ambassadors Event – NCCPE

The National Co-organisating Centre for Public Engagement will host its next Public Engagement Ambassadors Event at Leeds University on Thursday the 26th of June 2014. The event will run from 10.30am – 4pm, and will include a showcase of some of the public engagement activities underway at Leeds, an opportunity for networking and a session in the afternoon on a choice of topics listed on the booking form.

NCCPE – Research in Context Training Course

There are significant benefits for researchers willing to engage with the social context of their work. These include finding fresh perspectives on their work; developing new skills; and developing more impactful research. However there are also challenges. Research is increasingly in the public eye and many emerging research areas provoke strong public interest, whilst others are condemned as irrelevant and a waste of public money.  Funders and policy makers have introduced a range of new policies, requirements and codes of practice to help researchers respond to these opportunities and challenges in effective ways.